Tim Pugh

Environmental and Mixed Media Artist

“Sycamore Sketch “

The outdoor artwork is a drawing of a crumpled and shrunken sycamore leaf, sketched onto the smooth bark surface of a tree.The tree was located at Black Wood ,at the bottom of a hill called Dent near Cleator Moor in West Cumbria. I used black and white charcoal to convey the various ripples of the shrunken leaf as I embossed the sculptural form onto the dry and very smooth surface.The drawing took 3 hours to complete and resembled a tattoo in form and composition. Black Wood is a very atmospheric place to work in and at times has an eerie feel especially in Winter.

“Tidal Puzzle “

I found a piece of jigsaw at South Beach near Whitehaven in West Cumbria and sketched out the outline onto a boulder using pencil and mixed media in February  2017. I wanted to convey a sense of mystery related to the unceasing motions of the tides and incorporated a photograph of the same beach at high tide. This was to suggest the inner workings of the complexity of tidal ranges and the artwork itself was photographed just as the sea threatened to engulf the drawing. I rubbed in charcoal to highlight the illusion of an ocean inside the boulder and the artwork lasted a couple of days before becoming engulfed in shingle. 

“Moon Tide”

The temporary drawing was created at South Beach in Whitehaven, West Cumbria in March 2017.The beach is a dangerous location due to subsidence from an old colliery tip and is closed to the public.I have to scramble over a wall and negotiate a steep bank to get access but it is one of my favourite places to create art because of the intriguing  variety of manmade and natural materials available to work with. I like to draw on the sandstone boulders and experiment with different materials in between the tides.”Moon Tide” was created on a freezing cold day using Moon imagery to suggest it’s influence on the tides .I used a photocopy and charcoal to create the idea of a window effect,highlighting  the natural textures within the boulder to compliment the imagery.The artwork took four hours to create and a recent visit back to the boulder revealed it was buried amidst shingle with only the tip showing,testament to the power and influence of the ever changing tides on the shoreline. 

“Beech Grids “

The temporary installation was created on a blustery day at Hawarden Park in North Wales in November 2016.Autumn was in its final throes and provided a cover of intensely coloured beech leaves.The vivid hues reminded me of a watercolour box and I had the idea to replicate the ‘pans’ of colours onto the smooth surface of a host Beech tree.Previous heavy rain had soaked the bark and this had the effect of acting like an adhesive in which to adhere cut out squares from Beech leaves onto the surface. I arranged the squares in a colour coordinated grid and as time went on the artwork because increasingly difficult to create. ..the breezes started to dry out the tree surface thus diminishing  the adhesive effect and the leaves started to blow away. I had a frustrating time photographing the artwork as leaves would conspire to blow away just as I was about to press the shutter button on the camera.In a few days time,all the leaves had turned brown due to the onset of early Winter frost but was glad I managed to create something from this final flush of Autumn 

“Dressed to impress “.

The woodland installation was created at Hawarden Woods in Flintshire , North Wales in October 2016.I borrowed a coathanger from a nearby clothes shop and proceeded to sketch out an outline of a wedding dress into the soft soil.I then filled in the interior space with carefully selected beech leaves , graduating the colours as I went . The effect was like the scales  of a fish and the colours of the leaves echoed the seasons of the woodland to maximum contrasting visual effect.The presence of a slight breeze threatened to disrupt the artwork but by late afternoon , all was calm again .The artwork took 5 hours to create and was covered in a new carpet of fallen leaves within a day.

“Glass Boat “.

This temporary installation was created in between the tides at North Beach in Whitehaven , West Cumbria in Autumn 2016.I collected fragments of glass gathered from the tideline and arranged them within an outline of an old schooner sketched out on the sand.The  boat was an old vessel originally constructed in Whitehaven and I wanted to use a material connected with the sea,hence the use of gathered glass.The glass itself came from old bottles which themselves had fragments of text embossed with references to Whitehaven hence reinforcing the links and connections with the subject matter and materials used.The artwork took 5/6 hours to create and photograph and was gone the next day with the glass being reclaimed by the waves . 

“Plastic Fantastic? “

“Plastic Fantastic? ” is a mixed media installation created at St Bees beach in West Cumbria in October 2016.The artwork was created in response to the continued occurrence of environmental degredation on the beach with vast amounts of plastic being deposited on the tideline. After collecting the waste, I decided to smother a beautifully formed boulder with the plastic to achieve a visually overwhelming effect of manmade artificial material, sharply contrasted against the natural backdrop. The intention  was to highlight the sheer amount of plastic that gets dumped by arranging a concentrated mass of material to catch the attention of passing visitors thus  raising awareness of the issue. At the same time I was also seduced by the bright  colours which in turn evokes mixed feelings of my intentions of what I wanted to convey. The artwork resembles some kind of scaly creature and people like me,enjoyed the vivid colours but were equally appalled by the amount of waste deposited in the locality. 

“SS Izaro “.

“SS Izaro”is a temporary mixed media drawing sketched onto a wooden groyne at St Bees beach in West Cumbria.The artwork was made in memory to the beaching of the merchant ship ,SS Izaro  over a hundred years ago on the rocks below the Cliff.There were no casualties and the Spanish crew camped out on the rocks for many weeks afterwards. The ship was laden with iron ore destined for Maryport and was eventually wrecked as it’s back buckled due to the weight of its cargo.Hence,for the drawing I used iron ore sediment and charcoal. The artwork also has an element of humourous intent with the triangle sign warning of shipwrecks ahead. I enjoyed creating my own sign and had some favourable comments from passers by.Not even sudden rain or splinters in my fingers spoilt the creative experience. 

“Clay Makers /The Ledge Of Fame “.

“Clay Makers /The Ledge Of Fame ” is a temporary installation created for the Ceramic Wales event at Glyndwr University, Wrexham at the start of September 2016.I created several artworks over the weekend using various clays, kiln prop furniture and other related materials. This artwork is made up of pressed imprints of guest ceramic makers invited over especially for the weekend. I painted ceramic iron ore laden mud,brought down from Cumbria, over the palms of participants and invited them to press their hands onto card so as to print their own ‘signature ‘.The card was then pressed into balls of clay, themselves mounted plinth like on a window ledge of the Art college.I collected five hand signatures and enjoyed the participatory element to the process where the artists had the opportunity to contribute in creating a joint artwork. It was a very enjoyable weekend where I relished the opportunity to experiment with the various materials. It was also a melancholy experience as I was working back at my old Art College I attended 30 years ago.

“Toxic Cocktail “.

The installation is made up of tideline bottles collected from various beaches in West Cumbria in July 2016. I was horrified at the sobering statistic that eight million tonnes of plastic waste is deposited into the oceans every year as well as attendant chemicals and toxins that accompany the plastic bottles. I highlighted the effects and consequences of the chemicals by enlarging and painting the warning signs found in tiny detail printed on the bottles. I used acrylic paint and marker pens to deliberately highlight and thus reinforce the dangers to maritime life posed by the different chemicals in the various bottles.The bottles were then positioned on a beach groyne and photographed whilst interested passers by stopped to have a look and reflect on the artwork. I was interested to show the artwork to the general public for responses and intend to exhibit future work in similar off site/pop alternative venues in the future.